U.S. Department of Education
2012 National Blue Ribbon Schools Program
A Public School  -  12WI1

 

School Type (Public Schools):
(Check all that apply, if any)  


Charter


Title 1


Magnet


Choice

Name of Principal:  Mrs. Lynn Bub

Official School Name:   Rockfield Elementary School

School Mailing Address:  

N132W18473 Rockfield Rd

Germantown, WI 53022-1165

 

County:   Washington  

State School Code Number*:   20580140

 

Telephone:   (262) 253-3472  

E-mail:   lbub@germantown.k12.wi.us

 

Fax:   (262) 253-3497

Web site/URL:   http://www.germantownschools.org/schools/rockfield/  

I have reviewed the information in this application, including the eligibility requirements on page 2 (Part I - Eligibility Certification), and certify that to the best of my knowledge all information is accurate.

_________________________________________________________  Date _____________________
(Principal’s Signature)

Name of Superintendent*: Dr. Susan Borden    Superintendent e-mail: sborden@germantown.k12.wi.us

District Name: Germantown   District Phone: (262) 253-3929

I have reviewed the information in this application, including the eligibility requirements on page 2 (Part I - Eligibility Certification), and certify that to the best of my knowledge it is accurate.

_________________________________________________________  Date _____________________
(Superintendent’s Signature)

Name of School Board President/Chairperson: Reverend Lester Spies

I have reviewed the information in this application, including the eligibility requirements on page 2 (Part I - Eligibility Certification), and certify that to the best of my knowledge it is accurate.

_________________________________________________________  Date _____________________
(School Board President’s/Chairperson’s Signature)

*Non-Public Schools: If the information requested is not applicable, write N/A in the space.

The original signed cover sheet only should be converted to a PDF file and emailed to Aba Kumi, Blue Ribbon Schools Project Manager (aba.kumi@ed.gov) or mailed by expedited mail or a courier mail service (such as Express Mail, FedEx or UPS) to Aba Kumi, Director, Blue Ribbon Schools Program, Office of Communications and Outreach, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave., SW, Room 5E103, Washington, DC 20202-8173.

 

PART I - ELIGIBILITY CERTIFICATION

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The signatures on the first page of this application certify that each of the statements below concerning the school’s eligibility and compliance with U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights (OCR) requirements is true and correct. 

  1. The school has some configuration that includes one or more of grades K-12.  (Schools on the same campus with one principal, even K-12 schools, must apply as an entire school.)
  2. The school has made adequate yearly progress each year for the past two years and has not been identified by the state as "persistently dangerous" within the last two years.
  3. To meet final eligibility, the school must meet the state's Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) requirement in the 2011-2012 school year. AYP must be certified by the state and all appeals resolved at least two weeks before the awards ceremony for the school to receive the award.
  4. If the school includes grades 7 or higher, the school must have foreign language as a part of its curriculum and a significant number of students in grades 7 and higher must take foreign language courses.
  5. The school has been in existence for five full years, that is, from at least September 2006.
  6. The nominated school has not received the Blue Ribbon Schools award in the past five years: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 or 2011.
  7. The nominated school or district is not refusing OCR access to information necessary to investigate a civil rights complaint or to conduct a district-wide compliance review.
  8. OCR has not issued a violation letter of findings to the school district concluding that the nominated school or the district as a whole has violated one or more of the civil rights statutes. A violation letter of findings will not be considered outstanding if OCR has accepted a corrective action plan from the district to remedy the violation.
  9. The U.S. Department of Justice does not have a pending suit alleging that the nominated school or the school district as a whole has violated one or more of the civil rights statutes or the Constitution’s equal protection clause.
  10. There are no findings of violations of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act in a U.S. Department of Education monitoring report that apply to the school or school district in question; or if there are such findings, the state or district has corrected, or agreed to correct, the findings.

 

PART II - DEMOGRAPHIC DATA

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All data are the most recent year available.

DISTRICT

1.

Number of schools in the district

4

 Elementary schools (includes K-8)

 

(per district designation):

1

 Middle/Junior high schools

1

 High schools

0

 K-12 schools

6

 Total schools in district

2.

District per-pupil expenditure:

10656

SCHOOL (To be completed by all schools)

3.

Category that best describes the area where the school is located:  

Rural

 

 

4.

Number of years the principal has been in her/his position at this school:

1

 

 

5.

Number of students as of October 1, 2011 enrolled at each grade level or its equivalent in applying school:

 

 

Grade

# of Males

# of Females

Grade Total

# of Males

# of Females

Grade Total

PreK

15

4

19

 

6

0

0

0

K

27

17

44

 

7

0

0

0

1

35

23

58

 

8

0

0

0

2

19

23

42

 

9

0

0

0

3

18

21

39

 

10

0

0

0

4

30

17

47

 

11

0

0

0

5

23

23

46

 

12

0

0

0

Total in Applying School:

295

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6.

Racial/ethnic composition of the school:

0

% American Indian or Alaska Native

 

4

% Asian

 

4

% Black or African American

 

4

% Hispanic or Latino

 

0

% Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander

 

88

% White

 

0

% Two or more races

 

 

100

% Total

Only the seven standard categories should be used in reporting the racial/ethnic composition of your school. The final Guidance on Maintaining, Collecting, and Reporting Racial and Ethnic data to the U.S. Department of Education published in the October 19, 2007 Federal Register provides definitions for each of the seven categories.

7.

Student turnover, or mobility rate, during the 2010-2011 school year:  

14%

 

This rate is calculated using the grid below.  The answer to (6) is the mobility rate.
 

(1)

Number of students who transferred to the school after October 1, 2010 until the end of the school year.

12

(2)

Number of students who transferred from the school after October 1, 2010 until the end of the school year.

29

(3)

Total of all transferred students [sum of rows (1) and (2)].

41

(4)

Total number of students in the school as of October 1, 2010

295

(5)

Total transferred students in row (3)
divided by total students in row (4).

0.14

(6)

Amount in row (5) multiplied by 100.

14

 

 

8.

Percent of English Language Learners in the school:  

0%

 

Total number of ELL students in the school:  

2

 

Number of non-English languages represented:  

2

 

Specify non-English languages:

Amharic

Vietnamese

 

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9.

Percent of students eligible for free/reduced-priced meals:  

15%

 

Total number of students who qualify:  

46

 

 

If this method does not produce an accurate estimate of the percentage of students from low-income families, or the school does not participate in the free and reduced-priced school meals program, supply an accurate estimate and explain how the school calculated this estimate.

These numbers have been calculated for us by our Food Service Director.

 

10.

Percent of students receiving special education services:  

27%

 

Total number of students served:  

79

 

 

Indicate below the number of students with disabilities according to conditions designated in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Do not add additional categories.

5

Autism

0

Orthopedic Impairment

0

Deafness

6

Other Health Impaired

0

Deaf-Blindness

9

Specific Learning Disability

4

Emotional Disturbance

31

Speech or Language Impairment

0

Hearing Impairment

0

Traumatic Brain Injury

4

Mental Retardation

0

Visual Impairment Including Blindness

0

Multiple Disabilities

20

Developmentally Delayed

 

11.

Indicate number of full-time and part-time staff members in each of the categories below:

 

Number of Staff

Full-Time

Part-Time

Administrator(s) 

1

0

Classroom teachers 

15

0

Resource teachers/specialists
(e.g., reading specialist, media specialist, art/music, PE teachers, etc.)

6

10

Paraprofessionals

0

21

Support staff
(e.g., school secretaries, custodians, cafeteria aides, etc.)

0

9

Total number

22

40

 

12.

Average school student-classroom teacher ratio, that is, the number of students in the school divided by the Full Time Equivalent of classroom teachers, e.g., 22:1:  

20:1

 

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13.

Show daily student attendance rates. Only high schools need to supply yearly graduation rates.

 

2010-2011

2009-2010

2008-2009

2007-2008

2006-2007

Daily student attendance

95%

96%

96%

95%

95%

High school graduation rate

%

%

%

%

%

 

14.

For schools ending in grade 12 (high schools):
Show what the students who graduated in Spring 2011 are doing as of Fall 2011

Graduating class size:

 

 

Enrolled in a 4-year college or university

%

Enrolled in a community college

%

Enrolled in vocational training

%

Found employment

%

Military service

%

Other

%

Total

0

%

15.

Indicate whether your school has previously received a National Blue Ribbon Schools award:

If yes, what was the year of the award?  

 

PART III - SUMMARY

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Rockfield Elementary has many strengths due in large part to the unique nature of our school community.  Rockfield is a rural school with a large square mile attendance area.  As the smallest of Germantown's Elementary Schools (300 students) in this rural setting, families participate actively in events at school. In short, Rockfield is a hub for the families in our area.    

Staff at Rockfield Elementary have a child-centered decision-making mindset and are self-proclaimed "lifelong learners."  Staff at Rockfield volunteer for optional professional development, book studies, and pilots.  For example, Rockfield had the largest CREATE (Culturally Responsive Education for All: Training and Enhancement) team during its inception year, which was populated by volunteer staff only.  This collaborative and enriching approach of our staff perpetuates the positive, energetic and caring atmosphere, and respect for each of the varying roles of staff in the school.  Truly, all staff work as a team to benefit all of our learners.

The Germantown School District has a mission statement of "Empowering and Inspiring Every Student to Success."  This statement is embodied at Rockfield Elementary in the language and expectations conveyed to the student body.  "The Rockfield Way" of showing safety, respect, and responsibility is a constant reminder that individual development of each student leads to healthy, well-adjusted, well-educated, and contributing members of society. 

Rockfield also houses the entire Early Childhood program for the district and is a leader in the field of special education for Germantown.  Educational themes that may previously have been "special education" ideals permeate all classrooms at Rockfield Elementary.  The strength of the instructional practices of special education staff have complimented and strengthened differentiated instruction in every regular education classroom and each curricular offering (art, music, physical education, library, and technology).

Rockfield Elementary has a tradition of integrating a character education program each year.  A theme is chosen in conjunction with RORY, the school's Raccoon mascot.  For the past several years, the theme has been "Respect Others, Respect Yourself."  Students have been recognized for their outstanding citizenship and the staff has integrated this piece into many aspects of our day.  The past year, the RORY committee has shifted its focus to service learning.  Our current theme is "Reach Out Rockfield Youth." Each grade level has selected a service project and a time-of-year to coordinate their work.  Students are recognized as a grade level and RORY has become a piece of character education in conjunction with our PBIS (Positive Behavior Intervention Strategies) efforts. 

 The Rockfield community shares many other traditions including 5th and 1st Grade "Reading Buddies,"  a fall festival called "Rocktoberfest," a spring cook-out in conjunction with a talent show and science fair, an annual spaghetti dinner and magic show, Rockfield Recognition Awards, and a day of camp as a school at year's end at Camp Minikani.  These "school family" endeavors have created a unique, close-knit atmosphere for students, parents, and staff that permeates our safe and welcoming learning environment.  The Parent-Teacher Association (PTA) at Rockfield has capitalized on our unique situation and has been able to increase family participation at PTA meetings by 50% over the past two years.  Their continued support of the school by fostering family-friendly events and supporting the school with needed items has strengthened the overall climate and welcoming atmosphere that is prevalent at Rockfield School.

 

PART IV - INDICATORS OF ACADEMIC SUCCESS

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1.  Assessment Results:

Students in grades 3, 4 and 5 at Rockfield Elementary take the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Examination (WKCE) every year in late October/early November. 

The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction uses the WKCE data to compare the achievement of students across the state in Grades 4, 8 and 10.  Thus, students in these three grade levels are given a more comprehensive exam.  Students in these specific grade levels are tested in reading, mathematics, writing, science, and social studies.  Students in all other grade levels are only tested in reading and math on these state assessments.

There are four levels of performance on the WKCE: minimal, basic, proficient, and advanced.  Students score in one of these levels depending on the accuracy and quality of their responses.  Students "meet the standard" if they score in the proficient or advanced levels.

Almost all Rockfield Elementary students take the WKCE exams each year, including those identified with special education needs (i.e. learning disabilities, ADD, or cognitive impairment). On any given year, only 0%-1% of our students take an alternative assessment due to severe cognitive delays.

The WKCE data for Rockfield Elementary have exhibited consistently high achievement levels in all grades over the past five years.  97%-100% of our students have consistently shown proficiency on these exams.  Of these proficient students, most have reached the advanced level of proficiency.  Every summer, our Building Leadership Team examines the WKCE data, along with a collection of other formative and summative data.  The examination of this data is what drives the revisions to our School Improvement Plan for each subsequent school year. 

Rockfield also uses formative data in various forms throughout the year, as well.  These include Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) testing in reading and language arts for grades 3-5, with the addition of mathematics MAP testing this year, running records literacy assessments for students K-5, math unit assessments and district writing assessments at all levels.  Students in the Germantown School District tend to perform above their national counterparts on these assessments, and the data is used to help students participate in their own academic goal-setting.

2.  Using Assessment Results:

Staff at Rockfield use data in a variety of ways to inform their instruction. The Building Leadership Team meets in the summer to review the most recent data and begin to identify trends, patterns, and tendencies.  This reflection leads to an annual revision of the School Improvement Plan.  Over the summer, the leadership team meets to re-draft the plan, it is approved by the Board of Education, and is shared with the entire staff for the upcoming school year.

At each grade level, staff utilize data to inform their instruction, communicate with parents, and collaborate to move students forward.  Students in grades one through five take the Gates-MacGinitie standardized assessment for reading.  This data is used as a measure of one year's growth for our students.  The assessment is administered in the spring and the data evaluated in the fall to create intervention groups in the area of reading comprehension. 

Rockfield School has a strong focus on early intervention in the area of reading.  Our kindergarten students are assessed in the areas of letter identification and sound production in September.  In October, kindergarten students are again assessed in the areas of rhyming and blending.  For non-readers, a concepts of print assessment is used in lieu of running records.  First grade students take the Early Reading Screening Instrument (ERSI) in the fall. This assessment is comprised of phonemic awareness, phonics, sight word vocabulary, and reading comprehension.  In both the fall and spring, first grade students participate in a sentence dictation to help us determine their proficiency in spelling and knowledge of punctuation.  Data from these assessments is used to create intervention groups that may receive support either in the classroom or from the reading specialist.

Currently, the Germantown School District is in its second year of MAP testing.  Students in grades three through five take this responsive test three times during the year, in addition to the Running Records Assessment to gauge their reading level.  Staff work with our Reading Specialist, as well as with their grade level teams and support staff, to determine students' needs. The district is in the process of adding a math MAP assessment to our testing cycle.  In future cycles, students will also participate in the language arts MAP assessments. 

As the Germantown School District moves toward a comprehensive Response to Intervention system, staff at Rockfield plan and implement interventions for individuals and groups of students that are closely monitored for progress. 

3.  Sharing Lessons Learned:

Rockfield has shared our successes using Daily Five and CAFE with other schools in the Germantown School District. This has occurred during our district in-service trainings and mentor meetings.  Staff who are unfamiliar with this framework have benefitted from teacher modeling and the ability to use the progress-monitoring tools created by Rockfield staff.  As one of the few schools in the district with 100% implementation of the Daily Five and CAFE frameworks, Rockfield staff provide examples and support to other teachers within the district.

Rockfield frequently welcomes other professionals from surrounding districts into our building for collaborative purposes.  Schools considering implementation of the Daily Five framework visit our classrooms to see this framework in action and to ask questions.  Our staff welcome these colleagues and have maintained contact via e-mail with other schools to encourage and support them. 

Staff at Rockfield have served as trainers for our Einstein science units and SMART Board trainings across the district.  Many of our staff are "teacher leaders" serving on various committees.  Their work affords us the opportunity to gain insight and ideas, as well as contribute to the advancement of the overall curriculum in Germantown Schools.

4.  Engaging Families and Communities:

The Rockfield School community engages families using both traditional and non-traditional approaches.  Some traditional approaches include a very active and welcoming Parent-Teacher Association (PTA).  The PTA believes its function is to go beyond fundraising and purchasing needed items for the school.  While the PTA does, in fact, provide many needed items to the school, including many of the school's Smart Boards, the PTA also engages families and community through quality family events.  These events have included well-attended spaghetti dinner/magic show nights, movie nights, carnivals, book fairs, walk-a-thons, family benefits, and so much more.  These events help create a bridge between families and the Rockfield staff, opening doors for conversations that may have been difficult without strong relationships.

Within the past two years, the PTA has spent time communicating a philosophy and mission statement to reflect the PTA goals.  Their budget reflects this change with the addition of two separate budget categories designed solely for the purpose of bringing the school community together: "Community Building Events," and "Rockfield Improvements."  The PTA has expressed that their goals are not just about fundraising and purchasing "things," but also about contributing to a welcoming atmosphere and sense of service for our school community and beyond.  Students and families within our building have benefitted from this approach, as well as various food pantries, the Germantown Scholarship Foundation, and other community organizations.  The Rockfield PTA is also mindful to bridge this sense of community to our "graduates" by asking our Germantown High School students to serve and participate at Rockfield events.

The staff take great steps to inform families of school happenings and to involve families in the evolution of education.  For example, MAP testing and grading changes were supported through parent listening sessions.  Teachers maintain their own web pages to increase school to home communication.  Rockfield has an on-site teacher web-master, who helps teachers add to and update their pages.  Teachers post homework assignments, pictures, and newsletters, as well as curriculum information, which helps to keep families informed and connected to their child's classroom and the school.  Our library website supports staff and students with resources, online subscriptions, and library catalog access at home, school, or away from school.

The guidance program in the Germantown School District coordinates "G-Talks" at strategic points in each child's educational career.  During these sessions, students lead a discussion with their parent or guardian about their academic progress, goals and dreams, and overall academic plan.  School counselors facilitate the meeting and help parents to understand how the school can help their child achieve their goals.  G-Talks take place in fifth grade at Rockfield Elementary, as well as twice more during a child's educational career in Germantown. 

In addition to engaging families, the Rockfield School Community works with the greater community, as well.  STEP (Senior Tax Exchange Program) volunteers, for example, are senior citizens that spend time working in our building performing various tasks.  Both the seniors and the students enjoy this relationship and benefit from it.  Other examples of community involvement include our various service projects, which bring our staff and students into contact with organizations such as the Milwaukee Rescue Mission, various senior centers in our community, Project Linus, K-Kids (a division of Kiwanis Club), the Humane Society, and many others.

 

PART V - CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION

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1.  Curriculum:

The curriculum at Rockfield Elementary is integrated and delivered across all subject areas.  Classroom teachers meet as a grade level team and with special area teachers to discuss ways that core subjects can be extended and practiced within those enrichment areas. 

Our teaching staff has had specific training on the most effective teaching methods to use with students. Staff regularly participate in study groups that focus on a book or research-based practice.  Most recently, staff voluntarily participated in several book studies, which resulted in our entire staff implementing the Daily Five and CAFE' frameworks for literacy instruction.  This year, our book study model at Rockfield has been implemented within the entire district, as all elementary instructional staff participate in a book study surrounding best practices in Guided Reading Instruction.

The district and school uses the Growing With Mathematics program in grades K-5.  This particular program was selected for a number of reasons.  It incorporates problem-solving, hands-on, active learning, and matches closely with our state and district benchmarks for each grade level.  We also have additional programming, provided by our CESA cooperative in the form of Title I math support.  Students who qualify for services meet with our Title I teacher weekly to strengthen their number sense and computational fluency.  This program has truly benefitted our struggling mathematicians and is evidenced by our excellent math scores on the WKCE state assessment.

In the area of written language, the Germantown School District utilizes two sets of materials: the Write Source materials, as well as materials which support a writer's workshop approach following the teachings of Lucy Caulkins.  Students participate in district-wide writing assessments, which have proven valuable in tracking both our approaches to writing, as well as individual student progress and needs.  In addition to these materials, Six Traits of Writing concepts are embedded into writing lessons.   

Science in our district utilizes an experiential approach, whereby students regularly follow the scientific method to predict, monitor, and share results of their studies.  The Discovery Works and Einstein materials are used at each grade level.  Over time, various staff have become proficient with these materials and now offer in-house training to new staff.

The Social Studies curriculum for the district is tied to four Wisconsin model academic standard strands including geography, history/culture, economics, and political science/civics.  Teachers at Rockfield create cross-categorical connections and include as many real-life examples and field trips as possible.  Annual field trips for our building have included the Capitol trip to Madison, maple syrup tapping, Ye Olde School House, and Old World Wisconsin.  Social studies concepts are strengthened by using multi-media to create projects, role-plays, and Rockfield's unique tradition of creating their own Wisconsin History text book. 

Rockfield School also has qualified teachers in each specialty area of Library and Media, Physical Education, Music, Art, and Technology.  Since Rockfield is the smallest of the elementary schools in the Germantown School District, we have the benefit of sharing staff with other schools.  This brings additional ideas to our building and affords us a unique connection to the other three elementary buildings in the district. 

Various measures of student progress indicate that our curriculum is strong and our teachers are implementing best-practice instructional methods.  We continue to monitor and adjust our curriculum and teaching methods based on brain research and the latest research-based instructional methods. 

2. Reading/English:

Reading instruction in all Rockfield K-5 classrooms involves a balance of skills instruction and meaning-making opportunities using authentic texts.  Current best practice research in this area has shown that skills are learned best when taught through meaningful use, rather than in isolation.  We realize that some students benefit from direct instruction.  However, skill instruction that grows out of literacy activities is intrinsically more motivating.  Because students come to us with varied abilities, a balanced approach affords us the opportunity to use a repertoire of strategies to best meet the needs of all of our students.  Currently, all of our staff use the Daily Five and/or CAFE' framework for reading instruction. This framework allows staff to implement reading curriculum in a differentiated manner for students at varying skill levels, as well as fostering independence.

The components of our balanced literacy block are: reading aloud, shared reading, guided reading, independent reading, word work, and writing.  The important areas of literacy which are addressed in these components are reading comprehension, the writing process, language and vocabulary knowledge, word reading and spelling strategies, and self-selected reading.  Within this framework, using a gradual release of responsibility model, a comprehension strategy, like visualizing, would be modeled during an interactive read-aloud in a big book or using the Smart Board.  The teacher models "think alouds" about what he or she is visualizing, followed by guided practice of that strategy during guided reading, while gradually increasing the difficulty.  The ultimate goal is the independent creation of meaning in text.

Students are evaluated and monitored frequently in the classroom.  Those students identified with specific weakness are supported by the teacher in small guided reading groups.  In addition to support in the classroom, students may be pulled out for extra reading support administered by the reading specialist and well-trained reading aides.  As mentioned, early intervention is a priority, with kindergarteners and first graders receiving the most support.  For students who are exceeding the standards, guided reading groups at higher levels, along with Great Books sessions provide additional opportunities for enrichment and practice.

Every other year, the school experiences a culminating reading event when we host an author's visit to our building.  Each grade level has an opportunity to work with the visiting author on a writing project and related activity.  Examples have included creation of poetry, with the opportunity to receive writing feedback directly from an author. 

3.  Mathematics:

Rockfield has been especially fortunate in receiving the services of our District Instructional Specialists. The Math and Science Instructional Specialist relationship with the elementary schools in the district has helped to shape the structure and approach to math education.  The Instructional Specialist provides professional development in small doses at staff meetings and in-services, focusing on algebraic, number-sense, and other concepts which will enhance learning and facilitate differentiation in the area of mathematics education. 

Currently, students experience the spiraled curriculum of Growing with Mathematics.  Each Growing with Mathematics investigation allows for differentiation.  Teachers use these options to extend or remediate the lesson so that all learners can be working on the same concept, but at varying, appropriate levels.  Because the program is spiraled, there are multiple opportunities to revisit a math concept/strand.  Inherent in the "Growing" philosophy is the encouragement and celebration of multiple approaches to problem-solving.  As learners progress from the manipulative to symbolic stages, they gradually "see" that some strategies are more efficient than others.  Thus, students become empowered to choose the best method or strategy for their learning style and ability.  This, in turn, builds confidence and independence. As staff have worked with these materials, they have identified strategies to enhance their mathematics instruction through supplementary and technology-related materials, such as fact books and games, math journals, ixl.com, applications designed to build computational fluency, and more.

Students who are especially gifted in the area of mathematics have received support and modified curricular plans through the District's evolving gifted and talented program.  Students are assessed by an instructional specialist and the results are shared with a team including parents, classroom teacher, school psychologist, principal, and other related staff.  Students at Rockfield have had the opportunity to participate in advanced math curriculum, project-based learning, and independent challenges using technology.

Likewise, students who struggle in the area of mathematics have had the opportunity for support through the Title I program.  Rockfield Elementary qualifies for Title I services by way of our free and reduced lunch percentage. Students are screened as early as the middle of the Kindergarten year and enrichment occurs two days per week.  During lessons with the Title I teacher, students work on number and symbol sense, mathematical vocabulary, and computational fluency.  Students are assessed regularly and are dismissed from support as they show appropriate growth or are able to work at grade level.

4.  Additional Curriculum Area:

Rockfield School is very fortunate to have the support of our PTA and our district in the acquisition of technology in our building.  This school year marks the completion of installation of SMART Boards in each regular education classroom, along with the purchase of a SMART Table for our Early Childhood program. 

With the support of the district library media specialists, Rockfield has also been able to utilize the common school funds allocated to our district to purchase an  i-Pad cart for our library.  The cart houses thirty i-Pads that are shared by all staff and students in the building.  This addition has opened up many applications and internet-based programs to our school for integration into lessons, as well as providing choices for remediation and enrichment to our students, and various types of electronic and interactive books.  Special education students and staff have particularly blossomed with this addition, springboarding applications for students who need help with communication needs, writing, phonics, and more. 

All students utilize the computer lab for weekly instruction.  Early Childhood students work on their hand-eye coordination and an introduction to technology, all students attend virtual field trips throughout the year, and both the computer lab and i-Pad cart are used to give students options in demonstrating their knowledge.  Each year, third grade students are introduced to movie-making software by creating their own movie.  In a similar fashion, each grade level has one technology-related highlight in their instruction.  Students are aware of the technology used by their varying grade level peers and look forward to these events.

5.  Instructional Methods:

Instructional strategies employed by teachers at Rockfield Elementary vary depending on students' interests and abilities, with high expectations for all students.  Thanks to excellent professional development offerings each year, teachers have an extensive repertoire of instructional methods to utilize.  Teachers work with students to set appropriate goals for independent and cooperative learning, approach reading using literature circles and guided reading, and employ flexible groupings and workshop formats that allow for student choice in areas of interest and learning modality.  Staff pre-assess in most subject areas as a matter of routine.  This has instilled positive progress-monitoring habits into our building.

Rockfield is fortunate to have various aides in the building.  Their services are utilized for a variety of needs, including differentiated reading groups, technology instruction, and many other child-centered strategies. Our technology aide has been especially instrumental in providing staff coaching, as well as additional and differentiated activities for various learners.   The technology aide has helped third, fourth and fifth grade students to use Glogster to create and share their subject-related writing and art work. The technology aide has also created a wiki and other web-tools so students can access learning more easily.  This work has extended accessibility of these options to families, staff and students outside of the regular school day.

Rockfield's instructional reading aides work under the direction of our Reading Specialist to create more intervention time for both struggling students and those reading above their grade level.  The reading department has coordinated the reading buddies program so students can mentor one another in the area of reading. 

6.  Professional Development:

Rockfield Elementary participates in the high-quality professional development offered by the Germantown School District.  Part of the philosophy of the district includes the accessibility of professional development at the building level on a regular basis.  Professional development options are chosen to provide opportunities to refine and tailor instruction to meet the needs of each diverse class.

A key piece of professional development at each elementary building rests with our very capable reading staff. At each building, a full-time Reading Specialist works with teachers in groups, in the classroom, and at district professional development to coach staff on the most current research-based approaches to the teaching of reading. Due to this structure, staff at Rockfield have been utilizing current strategies and continue to modify their teaching each school year.

Staff at Rockfield also benefit from the services of two instructional specialists.  These specialists serve the district in the areas of literacy and math/science.  Teachers experience coaching in their classrooms, assistance with the creation, delivery, and analysis of assessments, and assistance with individual students.

Grade-level teams work collaboratively to develop a SMART (Specific Measureable Active Results-oriented Time-specific) goal, which is tied to the School Improvement Plan. Staff gather baseline data on their students, collaborate to develop strategies to implement, and chart progress and summative results.

7.  School Leadership:

School leadership at Rockfield is an inclusive process which springboards the talents of teacher leaders in the building, at the district level, and in conjunction with educational specialties.  At the building level, a Building Leadership Team (BLT), which consists of teachers, support staff, parents, and the principal, meets monthly to monitor progress of the school improvement plan.  The BLT reviews data annually and reviews important building decisions, providing recommendations on behalf of all stakeholders. 

Additionally, staff are encouraged to take leading roles in areas of strength that represent other facets of education including a Technology Committee, Assistive Technology, Culturally Responsive Education (CREATE), Positive Behavior Intervention Strategies (PBIS) and Response to Intervention (RTI).  This structure has created a strong culture of shared leadership and has facilitated a smooth transition for the recent building-level administrative change.

The previous building-level principal worked with the Rockfield staff for eleven years and was instrumental in creating a climate that encouraged professional growth.  Staff were given the tools and the autonomy to use the art and science of their craft, along with the knowledge of their students, to create an environment of learning.  The current principal has utilized this framework to help staff continue their growth as a model for other schools. 

At the district level, a District Administrator's Advisory Council (DAAC), which consists of the district equivalent of the Building Leadership Team, meets quarterly to provide feedback, communication, and advice between district administration and all staff and the community.  As Wisconsin continues to experience many changes in the field of education, the DAAC has served the function of increasing communication amongst stakeholders and has provided a forum for clearing misconceptions, resolving concerns, and creating consistency for the Germantown School District.

 

PART VII - ASSESSMENT RESULTS

 

STATE CRITERION-REFERENCED TESTS

Subject: Mathematics

Grade: 3

Test: Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Examination

Edition/Publication Year: 2006-07 to 2010-11

Publisher: CTB McGraw-Hill

 

 

2010-2011

2009-2010

2008-2009

2007-2008

2006-2007

Testing Month

Nov

Nov

Nov

Nov

Nov

SCHOOL SCORES

Proficient

100

95

98

97

100

Advanced

68

53

68

57

70

Number of students tested

38

41

41

35

37

Percent of total students tested

100

100

100

100

100

Number of students alternatively assessed

0

2

0

0

0

Percent of students alternatively assessed

0

5

0

0

0

SUBGROUP SCORES

1. Free/Reduced-Price Meals/Socio-economic Disadvantaged Students

Proficient

100

88

83

100

100

Advanced

67

50

50

20

67

Number of students tested

3

8

6

5

3

2. African American Students

Proficient

100

100

100

Advanced

0

50

0

Number of students tested

0

1

2

1

0

3. Hispanic or Latino Students

Proficient

100

100

100

Advanced

0

50

67

Number of students tested

2

0

2

0

3

4. Special Education Students

Proficient

100

88

100

100

Advanced

80

75

25

33

Number of students tested

5

8

4

0

6

5. English Language Learner Students

Proficient

100

100

100

Advanced

100

0

0

Number of students tested

0

0

1

2

1

6. Asian

Proficient

100

100

100

100

Advanced

0

100

0

0

Number of students tested

0

1

2

3

1

NOTES:  

12WI1

 

STATE CRITERION-REFERENCED TESTS

Subject: Reading

Grade: 3

Test: Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Examination

Edition/Publication Year: 2006-07 to 2010-11

Publisher: CTB McGraw-Hill

 

 

2010-2011

2009-2010

2008-2009

2007-2008

2006-2007

Testing Month

Nov

Nov

Nov

Nov

Nov

SCHOOL SCORES

Proficient

100

95

95

100

100

Advanced

82

63

61

77

70

Number of students tested

38

41

41

35

37

Percent of total students tested

100

100

100

100

100

Number of students alternatively assessed

0

2

0

0

0

Percent of students alternatively assessed

0

5

0

0

0

SUBGROUP SCORES

1. Free/Reduced-Price Meals/Socio-economic Disadvantaged Students

Proficient

100

100

83

100

100

Advanced

67

25

33

60

67

Number of students tested

3

8

6

5

3

2. African American Students

Proficient

100

100

100

Advanced

100

50

100

Number of students tested

0

1

2

1

0

3. Hispanic or Latino Students

Proficient

100

100

100

Advanced

50

50

67

Number of students tested

2

0

2

0

3

4. Special Education Students

Proficient

100

100

75

100

Advanced

80

37

25

33

Number of students tested

5

8

4

0

6

5. English Language Learner Students

Proficient

0

100

100

Advanced

0

0

0

Number of students tested

0

0

1

2

1

6. Asian

Proficient

100

50

100

100

Advanced

0

50

0

0

Number of students tested

0

1

2

3

1

NOTES:  

12WI1

 

STATE CRITERION-REFERENCED TESTS

Subject: Mathematics

Grade: 4

Test: Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Examination

Edition/Publication Year: 2006-07 to 2010-11

Publisher: CTB McGraw-Hill

 

 

2010-2011

2009-2010

2008-2009

2007-2008

2006-2007

Testing Month

Nov

Nov

Nov

Nov

Nov

SCHOOL SCORES

Proficient

100

100

98

98

97

Advanced

56

71

70

56

68

Number of students tested

46

45

44

41

34

Percent of total students tested

100

100

100

100

100

Number of students alternatively assessed

2

0

0

0

1

Percent of students alternatively assessed

4

0

0

0

3

SUBGROUP SCORES

1. Free/Reduced-Price Meals/Socio-economic Disadvantaged Students

Proficient

100

100

100

75

75

Advanced

50

56

50

50

25

Number of students tested

8

9

4

4

4

2. African American Students

Proficient

100

100

100

100

Advanced

25

50

0

0

Number of students tested

4

2

1

0

1

3. Hispanic or Latino Students

Proficient

100

100

100

67

Advanced

0

100

0

33

Number of students tested

1

2

1

3

0

4. Special Education Students

Proficient

100

100

80

83

86

Advanced

63

67

20

33

43

Number of students tested

8

6

5

6

7

5. English Language Learner Students

Proficient

100

100

100

100

Advanced

63

67

20

33

43

Number of students tested

8

6

5

6

7

6. Asian

Proficient

100

100

100

100

100

Advanced

0

100

67

0

100

Number of students tested

1

2

3

1

1

NOTES:  

12WI1

 

STATE CRITERION-REFERENCED TESTS

Subject: Reading

Grade: 4

Test: Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Examination

Edition/Publication Year: 2006-07 to 2010-11

Publisher: CTB McGraw-Hill

 

 

2010-2011

2009-2010

2008-2009

2007-2008

2006-2007

Testing Month

Nov

Nov

Nov

Nov

Nov

SCHOOL SCORES

Proficient

98

98

100

100

97

Advanced

65

64

66

56

65

Number of students tested

46

45

44

41

34

Percent of total students tested

100

100

100

100

100

Number of students alternatively assessed

2

0

0

0

1

Percent of students alternatively assessed

4

0

0

0

3

SUBGROUP SCORES

1. Free/Reduced-Price Meals/Socio-economic Disadvantaged Students

Proficient

100

89

100

100

100

Advanced

38

33

50

50

50

Number of students tested

8

9

4

4

4

2. African American Students

Proficient

100

50

100

100

0

Advanced

0

50

0

0

0

Number of students tested

1

2

3

1

1

3. Hispanic or Latino Students

Proficient

100

100

100

100

Advanced

100

50

0

33

Number of students tested

1

2

1

3

0

4. Special Education Students

Proficient

88

83

100

100

100

Advanced

63

50

40

0

43

Number of students tested

8

6

5

6

7

5. English Language Learner Students

Proficient

0

100

100

0

Advanced

0

0

0

0

Number of students tested

0

1

3

1

1

6. Asian

Proficient

100

50

100

100

0

Advanced

0

50

0

0

0

Number of students tested

1

2

3

1

1

NOTES:  

12WI1

 

STATE CRITERION-REFERENCED TESTS

Subject: Mathematics

Grade: 5

Test: Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Examination

Edition/Publication Year: 2006-07 to 2010-11

Publisher: CTB McGraw-Hill

 

 

2010-2011

2009-2010

2008-2009

2007-2008

2006-2007

Testing Month

Nov

Nov

Nov

Nov

Nov

SCHOOL SCORES

Proficient

100

100

98

97

98

Advanced

77

81

80

74

83

Number of students tested

48

48

45

35

40

Percent of total students tested

100

100

100

100

100

Number of students alternatively assessed

0

0

0

0

0

Percent of students alternatively assessed

0

0

0

0

0

SUBGROUP SCORES

1. Free/Reduced-Price Meals/Socio-economic Disadvantaged Students

Proficient

100

100

100

100

100

Advanced

67

60

50

75

100

Number of students tested

9

10

4

4

2

2. African American Students

Proficient

100

100

100

100

Advanced

100

0

100

0

Number of students tested

2

1

2

1

0

3. Hispanic or Latino Students

Proficient

100

100

100

Advanced

100

0

33

Number of students tested

2

1

3

0

0

4. Special Education Students

Proficient

100

100

83

80

100

Advanced

57

20

33

60

0

Number of students tested

7

6

6

5

2

5. English Language Learner Students

Proficient

100

100

100

100

Advanced

0

33

100

100

Number of students tested

1

3

1

1

0

6. Asian

Proficient

100

100

100

100

Advanced

50

25

100

100

Number of students tested

2

4

1

1

0

NOTES:  

12WI1

 

STATE CRITERION-REFERENCED TESTS

Subject: Reading

Grade: 5

Test: Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Examination

Edition/Publication Year: 2006-07 to 2010-11

Publisher: CTB McGraw-Hill

 

 

2010-2011

2009-2010

2008-2009

2007-2008

2006-2007

Testing Month

Nov

Nov

Nov

Nov

Nov

SCHOOL SCORES

Proficient

100

96

96

97

100

96

60

75

49

66

78

Number of students tested

48

48

45

35

40

Percent of total students tested

100

100

100

100

100

Number of students alternatively assessed

0

0

0

0

0

Percent of students alternatively assessed

0

0

0

0

0

SUBGROUP SCORES

1. Free/Reduced-Price Meals/Socio-economic Disadvantaged Students

Proficient

100

90

75

100

100

96

56

50

25

25

100

Number of students tested

9

10

4

4

2

2. African American Students

Proficient

100

100

100

100

96

100

100

50

0

Number of students tested

2

1

2

1

0

3. Hispanic or Latino Students

Proficient

100

100

100

96

50

0

33

Number of students tested

2

1

3

0

0

4. Special Education Students

Proficient

100

100

67

80

100

96

14

50

17

40

0

Number of students tested

7

6

6

5

2

5. English Language Learner Students

Proficient

100

100

100

100

96

0

0

0

0

Number of students tested

1

3

1

1

0

6. Asian

Proficient

100

75

100

100

96

50

0

0

0

Number of students tested

2

4

1

1

0

NOTES:  

12WI1

 

STATE CRITERION-REFERENCED TESTS

Subject: Mathematics

Grade: Weighted Average

 

 

2010-2011

2009-2010

2008-2009

2007-2008

2006-2007

Testing Month

SCHOOL SCORES

Proficient

100

98

98

97

98

Advanced

67

69

72

61

74

Number of students tested

132

134

130

111

111

Percent of total students tested

100

100

100

100

100

Number of students alternatively assessed

2

2

0

0

1

Percent of students alternatively assessed

1

1

0

0

1

SUBGROUP SCORES

1. Free/Reduced-Price Meals/Socio-economic Disadvantaged Students

Proficient

100

96

92

92

88

Advanced

60

55

50

46

55

Number of students tested

20

27

14

13

9

2. African American Students

Proficient

100

100

100

100

100

Advanced

50

25

60

0

0

Number of students tested

6

4

5

2

1

3. Hispanic or Latino Students

Proficient

100

100

100

67

100

Advanced

40

66

33

33

67

Number of students tested

5

3

6

3

3

4. Special Education Students

Proficient

100

95

86

81

93

Advanced

65

56

26

45

33

Number of students tested

20

20

15

11

15

5. English Language Learner Students

Proficient

11

100

100

100

100

Advanced

56

55

42

33

37

Number of students tested

9

9

7

9

8

6.

Proficient

100

100

100

100

100

Advanced

33

42

83

20

50

Number of students tested

3

7

6

5

2

NOTES:  

12WI1

 

STATE CRITERION-REFERENCED TESTS

Subject: Reading

Grade: Weighted Average

 

 

2010-2011

2009-2010

2008-2009

2007-2008

2006-2007

Testing Month

SCHOOL SCORES

Proficient

99

96

97

99

99

Advanced

68

67

58

65

71

Number of students tested

132

134

130

111

111

Percent of total students tested

100

100

100

100

100

Number of students alternatively assessed

2

2

0

0

1

Percent of students alternatively assessed

1

1

0

0

1

SUBGROUP SCORES

1. Free/Reduced-Price Meals/Socio-economic Disadvantaged Students

Proficient

100

92

85

100

100

Advanced

50

36

35

46

66

Number of students tested

20

27

14

13

9

2. African American Students

Proficient

100

75

100

100

0

Advanced

66

75

28

33

0

Number of students tested

3

4

7

3

1

3. Hispanic or Latino Students

Proficient

100

100

100

100

100

Advanced

60

33

33

33

67

Number of students tested

5

3

6

3

3

4. Special Education Students

Proficient

95

94

80

90

100

Advanced

50

44

26

18

33

Number of students tested

20

20

15

11

15

5. English Language Learner Students

Proficient

100

75

80

100

50

Advanced

0

0

0

0

0

Number of students tested

1

4

5

4

2

6.

Proficient

100

71

83

100

50

Advanced

33

14

16

0

0

Number of students tested

3

7

6

5

2

NOTES:  

12WI1

 PAGE